Tag Archives: Renault

Pit Stop – Turbo is back with a bang – By Lewis Brearley

Formula One testing gets underway only next week but until then there’s nothing really to except speculate. Who’s going to surprise? Who’s going to fail? How ugly exactly are the new cars?

However, all this is just an exercise in futility so until testing actually happens it’s worth looking back to Formula One’s previous turbo era: 1978 – 1988.

Renault was the very first team to race with a turbocharged engine, a 1.5 litre V6. While at first it was unanimously seen as a joke, slow and extremely unreliable, but by the end of the season the first signs of promise were visible.

The lack of reliability would plague the Renault throughout their span in the sport. Alain Prost had runs at the title in 1981, 1982 and 1983 but was always hampered by his car’s inability to finish.

All this disappointment and the loss of Prost to McLaren, caused Renault to withdraw from the sport at the end of 1985. However their turbo technology had revolutionised the sport.

By 1984 all the teams were using 1.5l turbocharged engines and the McLaren-TAG combination began to dominate despite impressive competition from Williams-Honda, taking three successive drivers’ championships from 1984-1986.

1987 saw the Williams-Honda finally take a driver’s championship with Nelson Piquet after his team mate, Nigel Mansell, severely injured his back which forced him to miss the final two races.

The year after was the final year for the turbos as they were banned for 1989 in a bid to slow the car’s down. But it was the final turbo year – 1988 – which came to define the era that preceded it.

McLaren procured the awesome Honda engine thanks to signing Ayrton Senna, who had built up a close relationship with the Japanese company in his time at Lotus. When combined with Alain Prost, then a double world champion, it delivered a championship double after winning an unprecedented and unbeaten 15 race wins out of 16 races.

The only thing that stopped McLaren taking a 100% sweep was the infamous incident at Monza, where Jean-Louis Schlesser turned in on Senna while being lapped, which cost McLaren the victory.

Despite the fact that the 2014 engines use turbos, the new and upcoming turbo era is going to be very different from the eighties. Whereas the old era was all about pure, awesome power with engines giving out more than 1000bhp when on maximum boost. This new era will be much more focused towards efficiency and refined power.

The turbo itself has a system where a large proportion of the waste heat from inside the turbo is stored and then utilised by the engine.

The style of racing will change for next year and whether it’s popular or not the technology inside the cars is an interesting and impressive step  up from the past few years.

Tagged , , , ,

Pit Stop – Engines at war – By Lewis Brearley

McLaren’s freshly announced engine partnership with Honda brings into focus the situation surrounding next year’s engine supplies.

Four teams have not yet confirmed which manufacturer they will use for power from 2014. Lotus, Sauber, Toro Rosso and Marussia are all still seeking final confirmation from their preferred choices.

With 11 teams on the grid and three engine manufacturers present next season, four teams for two manufacturers and three for the other appears to be the optimum and obvious solution.

However, upon further analysis it soon becomes clear that in reality this vision may be a little cloudier.

Renault has already confirmed deals with Red Bull, Caterham and Williams but has two more teams – Lotus and Toro Rosso – pitching for engines. If the Renaultsport management are to be taken at their word and a five team supply is indeed out of the question, that leaves one team left for either Mercedes or Ferrari.

In fact it’s this decision which is causing the logjam with the other teams’ engine supplies and Renault needs to make a decision quickly. But it’s not just a 50/50, random choice. Out of the two teams – Toro Rosso and Lotus – Lotus is the one most likely to deliver success and the worldwide promotion that follows. Yet on the other hand, Red Bull are pressuring the French firm to supply their sister team Toro Rosso and Red Bull is Renault’s number one, world championship-winning team.

Once this situation is resolved the rest of the grid will quickly be fully powered.
Mercedes, just like Renault, has three teams secured – Mercedes, McLaren and Force India – leaving space for the German manufacturer to pick up another should the need arise.

However, Ferrari has no engine supply deals agreed outside their works team. It’s very likely that they will supply their long-term partners Sauber and will very probably be contracted into supplying Toro Rosso should the Italian team be turned away by Renault.

This would leave Marussia, who can hardly cobble together enough money for an engine deal anyway, at the mercy of the generosity of Mercedes and Ferrari. Marussia hope that their signing of Ferrari academy driver, Jules Bianchi will persuade Ferrari into giving them a deal. But that is not a nailed-on certainly in even the slightest terms.

If this sounds complicated it’s simple when contrasted with the situation that would arise if Renault were to bow to Red Bull’s demands and Lotus were left at the doors of Mercedes and Ferrari.

The Enstone team’s first port of call would be Maranello, even if the name Lotus-Ferrari is anathema to the purists among you.

As bad as no Enstone team though? Because Ferrari have never in their history supplied a championship contending team (a rival) with engines and Mercedes would take some persuading to supply three championship contending teams when their own board are begging for success for their own team.

The die lies with Renault. When it is finally cast, one team reaches for the emergency plan.

Tagged , , , , , ,